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shootemz
09-01-2008, 06:08 PM
tell me if its any good http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll293/shootemz/beam.gif

TexasToast
09-01-2008, 06:45 PM
Work on smoothness, easing, and stiffness. The body didn't move at all. Keep practicing and you will get better.

Phosphorus
09-01-2008, 06:46 PM
Please, don't use other people's stks, especially when you suck dick at animating.

I see that you are having trouble making you're animation somewhat good, so I'll help you as much as I can. Don't worry, though, all animators need to start somewhere, and all of us have been where you are right now, so don't feel bad if you're flamed or mocked.

1. Basics
Basics include easing, smoothness, basic movements, stiffness, jerkiness, and physics. Practice these before moving on to more difficult things like effects, storyline animations, and other things that you won't be able to do at your current level.

I. Easing: Easing in an animation is when an object or limb gradually move faster, then slows down. This basic is hard to explain in words, so I'll try to show you with text.
This is an uneased example. (|= Frame, -= Space)
|--|--|--|--|--|
See how the spacing stays ,the same throughtout the whole thing? That makes that particular movement unnatural.

This is an eased example.
|-|--|---|----|---|--|-|
Notice how the spacing gradually becomes bigger than smaller? That's what easing is.

II. Smoothness: This is exactly what it sounds like. To make your animation less choppy and make it more fluid. It really is easy to fix, simply by adding more frames to movements. A 3 frame run will be really choppy, but a 8 frame run will be less choppy if animated correctly. Which brings me to my next point. Movements.

III. Basic Movements: These include running, walking, jumping, punching, kicking, etc. Practice animating these in simple tests with simple stks, then put them together to make more complex animations like fight sequences. If you're having trouble making you're movements realistically, find a video with the particular movement you're trying to animate, and try to imitate that. Or find a mirror and watch yourself.

IV. Stiffness: Stiffness is when the stickman you animated looks stiff and unrealistic. This may occur because you did not move the backbone that much (probably because you're using the default) or you just neglected to move one the limbs. To fix this, just try to move ALL the limbs in every frame, no matter how small the movement. Make sure to ease the movements though.

V. Jerkiness: Jerkiness occurs when you move a limb suddenly for an amount that is noticable to the human eye. Basically, you completely through easing out the window and just moved a limb to a location with no frames in between.

VI. Physics: This basic is probably the most lenient, because some animators ignore this and make cartoony animations, which have pretty wacky physics. But until you develop a style of animating, just stick with normal physics, or else some animators may call you lazy.

Now, just remember these aspects, and continue making more animations. You'll get better as you animate more, and you'll move on to more difficult and fun things, like effects. If you have trouble with something, check some great tutorials made by members of the forum, or go to www.darkdemon.org for other great tutorials. And remember, never be discouraged! You'll probably see that there are some douchebags who put down animators who are worse then they are, just because they can. Ignore these people, but if they become more and more abusive, report them and don't respond. Responding to them is the last thing you want to do. A way to avoid these people is to go to the beginner's section, where animators at your level congregate to post their animations in a friendly environment. Link here: http://www.stickpageportal.com/forums/showthread.php?t=35330 Have fun animating!

Written By Phosphorus on Monday, June 09, 2008, 4:37:29 PM

Krytical
09-01-2008, 07:02 PM
^ Nice. When making a beam test think about if you could do it in real life. You need to have a solid stance and show resistant when shooting a beam to make it realistic.

▀ub
09-01-2008, 07:36 PM
Phosfurus, you completely wasted your time typing all of that up. why not just copy and paste it from someone who already wrote all that shit?

Phosphorus
09-01-2008, 07:43 PM
Phosfurus, you completely wasted your time typing all of that up. why not just copy and paste it from someone who already wrote all that shit?

Because mines more descriptive. :/ And look at the date I typed it up.

shootemz
09-02-2008, 05:54 AM
Because mines more descriptive. :/ And look at the date I typed it up.
lol pepole lol :Smile:

fgp
09-02-2008, 09:59 AM
the beam should send him back a bit while he uses his strength to push forward , you need more movemant in the animation , small movements in each frame make it less choppy and smoother ,also instead of standing in the same place his body and legs should move.

zawmbee
09-02-2008, 10:22 AM
Because mines more descriptive. :/ And look at the date I typed it up.
no it isn't.
1) you've used that speech twice.
2) the welcoming thread me, jawz, lonewolf and thatguy use is better.

power fuse0
09-02-2008, 02:50 PM
^ Nice. When making a beam test think about if you could do it in real life. You need to have a solid stance and show resistant when shooting a beam to make it realistic.

lol you dont stand like a spack and only raise 1 arm though

Phosphorus
09-02-2008, 06:36 PM
no it isn't.
1) you've used that speech twice.
2) the welcoming thread me, jawz, lonewolf and thatguy use is better.

I've used the thing about 20000000000 times, and I am Lone wolf. -.-