PDA

View Full Version : A Conneticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court



Schwa
07-30-2009, 08:29 PM
I posted this in the recommended reading thread, but after reading it for another few hours I decided that it most definitely needed it's own thread.

I think this book would appeal to members of this site because of Mark Twain's still relevant and humorous, and entertaining writing style, as well as his assault on roman catholicism and organized (or even fundamental churches of the state) religion. As well as philosophies on the nature of humanity and free will and to what extent we are own people.

It also contains assaults on slavery, monarchies and ignorance.

Not only is it writ in such a way as to be an interesting story without any of the thought that encompasses the majority of it, but it also contains many of Mark Twain's philosophical ideals and theories.

Seriously, the only reason this post sucks so much is because the book is so damn awesome. I feel like I need to advertise it or whatever.

Because it's awesome.

And if you call within the next twenty minutes you'll get sexual favors of an unspecified nature, that's a $6.54 value, absolutely free.

nouve
07-31-2009, 12:08 AM
am I too late

Beta
07-31-2009, 01:51 AM
I think so. I'm sorry.

Schwa
07-31-2009, 07:36 AM
am I too late

Unfortunately, but you can still by this 500 page masterpiece at Barnes and Nobles for only $7, which is about the price of sexual favors from me.

Ash
07-31-2009, 07:59 AM
I posted this in the recommended reading thread, but after reading it for another few hours I decided that it most definitely needed it's own thread.

I think this book would appeal to members of this site because of Mark Twain's still relevant and humorous, and entertaining writing style, as well as his assault on roman catholicism and organized (or even fundamental churches of the state) religion. As well as philosophies on the nature of humanity and free will and to what extent we are own people.

It also contains assaults on slavery, monarchies and ignorance.

Not only is it writ in such a way as to be an interesting story without any of the thought that encompasses the majority of it, but it also contains many of Mark Twain's philosophical ideals and theories.

Seriously, the only reason this post sucks so much is because the book is so damn awesome. I feel like I need to advertise it or whatever.

Because it's awesome.

And if you call within the next twenty minutes you'll get sexual favors of an unspecified nature, that's a $6.54 value, absolutely free.

Read it,and yeah, it's amazing. I love the way he disproved Merlin's "magic".

BlisS
09-23-2009, 06:01 PM
I posted this in the recommended reading thread, but after reading it for another few hours I decided that it most definitely needed it's own thread.

I think this book would appeal to members of this site because of Mark Twain's still relevant and humorous, and entertaining writing style, as well as his assault on roman catholicism and organized (or even fundamental churches of the state) religion. As well as philosophies on the nature of humanity and free will and to what extent we are own people.

It also contains assaults on slavery, monarchies and ignorance.

Not only is it writ in such a way as to be an interesting story without any of the thought that encompasses the majority of it, but it also contains many of Mark Twain's philosophical ideals and theories.

Seriously, the only reason this post sucks so much is because the book is so damn awesome. I feel like I need to advertise it or whatever.

Because it's awesome.

And if you call within the next twenty minutes you'll get sexual favors of an unspecified nature, that's a $6.54 value, absolutely free.

Personally that'd be a great ad. I will read it on my IPod. I also dn't mean to ruin this Thread for this book but if you ever Ever get the chance read this one... City of Bones (Mortal Instruments) by Cassandra Clare you may like it meh, but a great twist.


Edit: im reading this and i can tell its old English, Duh. and the age in stickpage is prob. 12-16. I wouldn't recommend this to little kids. but to kids who can build on this vocabulary and really understand what this guy is writing about. Then yes i recommend this to those but to others... not so much

Edit: Jk that was just a story in the story. sorry imma shut up now and read the whole book before i make a judgement XD

Ash
09-27-2009, 07:03 AM
Personally that'd be a great ad. I will read it on my IPod. I also dn't mean to ruin this Thread for this book but if you ever Ever get the chance read this one... City of Bones (Mortal Instruments) by Cassandra Clare you may like it meh, but a great twist.


Edit: im reading this and i can tell its old English, Duh. and the age in stickpage is prob. 12-16. I wouldn't recommend this to little kids. but to kids who can build on this vocabulary and really understand what this guy is writing about. Then yes i recommend this to those but to others... not so much

Edit: Jk that was just a story in the story. sorry imma shut up now and read the whole book before i make a judgement XD

No, it's not old english.


This is old english:


Beowulf wæs breme (blæd wide sprang),
Scyldes eafera Scedelandum in.

Swa sceal geong guma gode gewyrcean,
fromum feohgiftum on fæder bearme,
þæt hine on ylde eft gewunigen
wilgesiþas, þonne wig cume,

leode gelæsten; lofdædum sceal
in mægþa gehwære man geþeon.

This is just english from the early 1900s.

You see, he was going for the Holy Grail. The boys all took a flier at the Holy Grail now and then. It was a several years' cruise. They always put in the long absence snooping around, in the most conscientious way, though none of them had any idea where the Holy Grail really was, and I don't think any of them actually expected to find it, or would have known what to do with it if he had run across it.

Schwa
09-27-2009, 07:35 PM
Actually Ash, he's talking about the introduction to the story and the little snippets in later chapters where it's taken straight from the stories where they're all like "And Sir Gallahad brast his shield and horse" and such like that.

BlisS
09-28-2009, 11:54 AM
Actually Ash, he's talking about the introduction to the story and the little snippets in later chapters where it's taken straight from the stories where they're all like "And Sir Gallahad brast his shield and horse" and such like that.

yeah. that one.

Ash
09-29-2009, 09:20 PM
Actually Ash, he's talking about the introduction to the story and the little snippets in later chapters where it's taken straight from the stories where they're all like "And Sir Gallahad brast his shield and horse" and such like that.

Erm... That's still not Old English. I posted an example of Old English.