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Xyskal
01-23-2016, 05:29 PM
I haven't animated consistently in a while, and today, I aim to change that!
I made this anim as a way to test a new style I had in mind.

http://sta.sh/020c04wil1m6

I also lowered my fps a little, and I think it helped alot.
I know the punch looks a little slow, I probably should have put less frames in it.
I think the heads look a little wonky. I will need to sort that out later.

Honestly this new style is really fun.
CnC is appreciated.

Ipman
01-25-2016, 08:12 AM
Well you kinda pointed out your own flaws but im just gonna state some others you didn't mention.

- The sticks itself are wobbly, try to get some good handling on making sticks.
- Not only did the punch need less frames, the whole animation needed less frames tbh. it's too slow.

But that's pretty much it, i mean, nothing much happened in the animation.

Unbounded
01-25-2016, 09:03 AM
To kinda add to what Ipman is saying, I've noticed in your stuff you tend to animate way more frames than you need in general. As a result everything ends up slower since you're using more time, (frames), for the same action, and it ends up wobbly since you have to redraw a bunch of frames really close together when you honestly don't need to.

As for other things:
-Their feet were slippin' and slidin'. I'll also attribute this to you animating way too many frames for a given action. It's hard to keep drawing a foot in one spot if you try to do it 50+ times.
-You have the blue guy's knee pointing away from the person he's uppercutting. It should still be pointed towards him at least somewhat.
-A pretty intense amount of resizing. This is something I've noticed in your stuff as well. It can likely also be attributed towards too many frames.

Keep in mind that simply animating more frames doesn't make something smoother or better. A lot of it comes down to how you handle your easing and spacing rather than the amount of frames that you pump into it.

That said, keep at it man! I'm looking forward to seeing what you eventually put out.

Xyskal
01-25-2016, 09:51 AM
Their feet were slippin' and slidin'. I'll also attribute this to you animating way too many frames for a given action. It's hard to keep drawing a foot in one spot if you try to do it 50+ times.
Oh thank God. Someone finally has a suggestion to fix this besides "try and draw the feet in 1 spot."


A pretty intense amount of resizing. This is something I've noticed in your stuff as well. It can likely also be attributed towards too many frames.
I thought the resizing wasn't as bad as my other animations though. Me putting too many frames in really messes everything up that much?


Keep in mind that simply animating more frames doesn't make something smoother or better. A lot of it comes down to how you handle your easing and spacing rather than the amount of frames that you pump into it.
I have found that if I use less frames, the animation becomes very fast, and I can't really register what is going on. Then again, I know absolutely nothing in terms of easing and spacing. Does anyone have any tutorials in particular that I can ok at to improve this?

GMR
01-25-2016, 11:14 AM
It's pretty slow. What FPS are you using? Also, not enough speed for the punch. Practice easing, and don't use that many frames. I use 24 fps, that's the standard. Yep, that's about it.

c: Improvement is good however.


*EDIT*:


Width = 600 Height = 300

Not very good, but you get my point, right? Lot less frames. Animated at 24 FPS.

Xyskal
01-25-2016, 11:46 AM
It's pretty slow. What FPS are you using? Also, not enough speed for the punch. Practice easing, and don't use that many frames. I use 24 fps, that's the standard. Yep, that's about it.
I now that 24 for is the standard, I just tried lowering it to 22 to help make things go by slower.

Unbounded
01-25-2016, 01:52 PM
Oh thank God. Someone finally has a suggestion to fix this besides "try and draw the feet in 1 spot."


I thought the resizing wasn't as bad as my other animations though. Me putting too many frames in really messes everything up that much?


It definitely can. More frames in a straight-ahead manner = more times where you have to redraw something = more chances to accidentally alter the size just a little bit.




I have found that if I use less frames, the animation becomes very fast, and I can't really register what is going on. Then again, I know absolutely nothing in terms of easing and spacing. Does anyone have any tutorials in particular that I can ok at to improve this?

It's all about picking and choosing where and when to have more or less frames. If the motion is supposed to be quick? Less frames. If it's supposed to be slow? More frames. Your entire animation doesn't necessarily have to be omgsuperfast, nor does it have to be at a snail's pace.

As for easing/spacing, I recommend you at least look at Alan Becker's tutorials on the 12 principles of animation. I personally like this one with regards to easing. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fQBFsTqbKhY&index=6&list=PL-bOh8btec4CXd2ya1NmSKpi92U_l6ZJd) This one is pretty good for timing. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BarOk2p38LQ&list=PL-bOh8btec4CXd2ya1NmSKpi92U_l6ZJd&index=9)

A while ago, Zero made a few good tutorials as well that helped me get the idea:

http://sta.sh/01nf015eefi3

http://sta.sh/08hg9r2vl2c

If you want to just focus on getting that one thing right, it helps to do something simple like a ball/some other object rolling down a hill or a ball bouncing as a short little exercise, and then try utilizing what you learn for your stick figure. It makes it pretty easy to apply and internalize the concepts if you tackle it like that.

Hope this helps!

Ipman
01-28-2016, 04:16 AM
I have found that if I use less frames, the animation becomes very fast, and I can't really register what is going on. Then again, I know absolutely nothing in terms of easing and spacing. Does anyone have any tutorials in particular that I can ok at to improve this?

As an addition to what Unbounded said, double framing is a bit of a help when your animation becomes too fast, or you can animate the movements small by small, but not too much on one movement. You get me?